Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Homemade Chalk Paint Pros & Cons

I know we have all seen the massive amount of chalk paint projects out there and don't get me wrong this post is not about bashing Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. The stuff is great......IF you can afford it.
 
I can't. 
I don't care how far one little quart goes, I can NOT afford it.  Now some people don't mind paying for the ease of not having to mix their own paint and to have the perfect blend. That's great too, but again, I can't afford it so I mix my own.
 
Also being a furniture reseller I like to keep my prices affordable, and when you use expensive paint/tools you then have to roll that cost over into your product, making it less affordable for the buyer.

These are just my opinions...again not knocking the ASCP, just letting you know if you are like me and like the look but just can not afford the price tag unless you and your family want to go without eating for a day, there are options....
 
This is the recipe I use. I rarely pass on a gallon of "Oops" paint at the hardware store when it is a nice color. I usually pick up some GREAT paint for around $5 a gallon. 

Now what you don't always hear is that flat is the best to use with this recipe, you will be happier with your results.
 
Here is another recipe using grout
 
No matter which recipe you use or if you buy the ASCP, you must wax. The paint adheres well with just one coat even over glossy finishes, but will rub off and is not water proof!
 
As much as I love chalk paint, I tend to forgo it for other methods when it comes to large items/projects, because the wax process can be time consuming and depending on the wax you buy it has a pretty strong odor. I have used the ASCP Wax and always have to go outdoors with it because it is very strong. Also it eats through the plastic gloves I use which causes some concern over the toxicity.  
 
Larger projects I always turn to my favorite method of primer and paint. I LOVE Zinser Primer. I use it over furniture that is highly glossed and it sticks very well. Then I use whatever paint I like, flat, semi gloss, high gloss, enamel, ect. 
 
The thing about paint, no matter which method you chose, is that the better quality paint you get the less work you will have to do. 
Cheap quality paint will require several coats, whereas a good quality paint will only require one. {Notice I say "quality" when referring to the cheapness and not price. It's fine, even encouraged, to go cheap on price but not on quality}
Again, "Oops" paints are amazing! I have purchased cans that were originally $40 for just $5. If it's not the perfect color you can always add a few drops of craft paint in the color of your choice .
 
The other thing I reccomend no matter what kind of paint you use is a good paint brush. I buy a new one every year, spending around $15 to $20 but it stays good for a long time and doesn't leave funky brush strokes. 
 
So there you have it folks, my lil opinion and what my go to paint choices are.
 
Hope that helps for those of you who have had questions and/or been wanting to try out the chalk paint recipes floating around in cyberspace.  
♥ 
 

41 comments:

  1. I found this so incredibly helpful. Thanks for posting. I had not ever read about the waxing... now that I have... I have to rethink the whole project but I love your recommended recipe. :)

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  2. good to hear your input. i feel like i've been waying the pro's and con's for awhile now too. always alot to consider when it comes to paint. have a great week!

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  3. Hi,

    Such great tips. I so enjoy your blog. I enjoy painting furniture too. I have tried the chalk mixed into the paint like you mentioned on one of your posts and the dresser turned out awesome. (at least I think so). Thanks for all your wonderful decor and painting tips. I have been following you for a while and Would love for you to follow me too if you would be so kind.

    Thanks again.
    Michele
    Pearl 13.1

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  4. I hear ya on the paint being high $$$$. I have done the grout with paint.

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  5. Very helpful, dear Nicki!
    I appreciate your candor!
    Thank you!
    ~Lynne
    w/L.

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  6. Very cool! I've never seen this before. Thanks for sharing :)

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  7. yes ,this does help. especially the hint about using "flat" and that mixing colors is an option even with oops paint which I will have to look into since I'm about to begin another major project of redoing my living room and all the furniture in it. I just went on a whim to an Annie Sloan stockist and the quarts were $42.95 and though I was willing to part with the money, it hurt, and in the end I didnt because the seller couldn't work out a price because I was $4.00 short for 3 quarts with one wax brush. So my interest is flagging and renewed in common latex paints because I did use it on my latest hutch/armoire project which came out gorgeous. Thanks for this! lady

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  8. Thanks for the great tips! I guess I'm one of the few people who haven't jumped on the ASCP band wagon. Like you, I just can't see spending that much money on paint! I'll have to keep my eye out for the "ooops" paint!

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  9. I'm not much into painting due to ill health but your tips sound great!

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  10. I have used that recipe and have been very happy with the results. I love your color combination and the dresser turned out great. Thanks for sharing!

    Solange

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  11. Oh wow...Nicki! I could have written this post.
    I too make my own DIY chalk paint. I've had big success with it...and yes! WAX IS KEY.
    I use Minwax ® furniture wax and it covers well...but is very strong! And... you need to make sure and get good coverage. Apply it let it sit and then buff the HECK out of it!
    So far good results for me.
    Also... OOPS! PAINT...IS MY FAVORITE COLOR.
    Great post. good tips.
    Thanks for getting the information out there.
    I certainly don't think its wrong to choose DIY over ASCP or any other brand for that matter.
    No different than choosing to make your own laundry soap...rather than NAME BRANDS like Tide or Gain.
    ...:) Pat

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  13. I read a thousand blogs and there are only two bloggers that have mentioned the word budget and finding ways of doing things as cheaply as possible. Even through the other blogs are fun to read...I would never be able to afford to redo a junky piece of furniture. I live within means and reason. My Husband and I redo furniture because we love it. But we have also furnished several homes for my daughter when they bought their new house, my nephew when he moved into his first apartment, several people who have lost everything or needed to start over. We buy on a budget, we have many friends who give us their castoffs and curbside finds. We have had complete strangers give us furniture because we will put it to good use. We have made furniture from scrape wood we have had left over or people who gave it to us for other families.
    I have made the paint you have given the recipe for....and I also bought a sample of chalk paint to get the same consistently as their paint. This recipe you have given is perfect. Hot water makes it so much easier to mix. I always mix the hot water and plaster of Paris first, then add the paint.
    I want to thank you once again. A lot of people don't have unlimited resources or unlimited income. But I and they want beautiful things the same as anyone I love your blog and love the fact that you understand and make it reasonable for everyone else to make something beautiful even on a budget. Thank You for that...it warmed my heart today. : )

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  14. Hi, I am Shari a new follower. I totally agree with the lady above me...I am to on a budget and your recipe will certainly come in handy. I am new at remodeling furniture and have a few pieces that I so wanted to redo but like you said....can't not afford it. This is perfect! Hopefully if weather permits I will give it a try. Thanks again, Shari

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  15. I agree with you: even if I see chalk paint used everywhere, I tend to be more selective and use it only on some specific projects... It has saved my days on few occasions, though. If you use natural bee wax, which I do, you won't have any toxicity issue. The smell is still strong, but I love it!

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  16. I completely agree with you Nicki. There is a lot of hype out there about chalk paint, but as someone who's been a DIY'er since before those popular paints came out I'll attest to the fact that you do NOT have to spend a lot to get the look! My budget does allow, but my creative side says to make up my own finishes in my own way....and for waxing I have used Briwax for decades.

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  17. What a wonderful post!! You have inspired my to make my own chalk paint, thank you, thank you!!

    Shirley

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  18. Thank you, Nicky...I have been wanting to try chalk paint but, not wanting to pay the price.Can't wait to find some OOPS paint, now!
    sweetinspirationsbyjpdesigns.blogspot.com

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  19. I agree with everything you said! I love my homemade chalk paint.

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  20. I was looking for a homemade chalk paint and found your site. Thanks so much for your insite.

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  21. Hello! I made some using this recip an it turned into a think chunky plaster when I mixed the pop and paint. So I added water and that thinned it a little but it was very thin and sandy and came off easily! I was just wondering if it was supposed to be gritty and sandy? And how would you create those distressed sanded edges??

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    Replies
    1. Hi Mark, I suspect that perhaps you didn't mix it quickly enough or well enough. It must be mixed into the paint quickly or it will harden. Also you need to mix it well to avoid the grittiness. I've not had these issues, so that would just be my best guess. The sanded edges are created with sand paper.

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  22. I made this recipe twice yesterday with valspar satin paint and it thickened up to a really thick paste. Can you tell me if you have had this happen? I tried the same recipe using flat paint and it was perfect....what's up with that? lol I would appreciate some input on this if you have any. Thanks

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  23. I made this recipe twice yesterday with valspar satin paint and it thickened up to a really thick paste. Can you tell me if you have had this happen? I tried the same recipe using flat paint and it was perfect....what's up with that? lol I would appreciate some input on this if you have any. Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Don't use Valspar paint. For some reason it just creates a block of goo when you mix it with the grout. I've never made the plaster of Paris version but I've heard it does the same thing.

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  24. When you prime with the zinser and then just use latex paint, do you finish with wax or some kind of poly?

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  25. Another great place to get inexpensive paint is Habitat for Humanity stores. They have partial cans people have donated.

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  26. Great info. Thanx so much. Here's a great hint. I take old batteries, yard products, electronics,etc to our recycling center and they have a little store-like that you can go in and shop at . With donations, you can take 5 items. They have paints other people turned in. And it's all FRFEE!!! Where can you get a better price. I came home with 5 sample cans, different colors, to use on flower pots and small projects. You never know what you'll find, gallons, spray paints, cleaning supplies, gardening supplies. Check with your city.

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  27. Thank you, your post was very helpful.

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  28. Pinning your recipe!http://www.sewsweetvintage.com/2013/07/vintage-swimwear.html

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  29. I just went out and bought some latex paint and some plaster of paris. I have everything prepped and ready to go on my first small project. I just realized that one of the colors I want to use is regular enamel paint and not latex paint. Is this going to make a huge difference? I don't want to botch my first project! Thanks.

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  30. I read some comments above on using Valspar satin paint and it clumping up. The odd part is that I used the Valspar (spending less than $3 on the sample size of whatever color I want) and had no problems with clumping/thickening until I went to mix am antique white color! At first I thought maybe I got distracted and wasn't paying attention when measuring my PoP and water, so I started over on my mixture and the same thing happened! But then I mixed other colors using this recipe and Valspar paint and didn't have this problem. Why just the white paint??

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  31. I read some comments above on using Valspar satin paint and it clumping up. The odd part is that I used the Valspar (spending less than $3 on the sample size of whatever color I want) and had no problems with clumping/thickening until I went to mix am antique white color! At first I thought maybe I got distracted and wasn't paying attention when measuring my PoP and water, so I started over on my mixture and the same thing happened! But then I mixed other colors using this recipe and Valspar paint and didn't have this problem. Why just the white paint??

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  32. What kind of primer do you use under the chalk paint?

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  33. Great article thank you for sharing your thoughts! I've never used chalk paint, mainly because I didn't know a stockist here in Sweden, but have had great results on my furniture projects using many other types of paint and primers on many different types of surfaces. Reading around I almost feel like a salmon swimming against the stream being the only person on the planet not using ASCP.

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  34. Absolutely gorgeous. You really know how to put a beautiful decorating ideas and interior designs , thanks for sharing it with us

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  36. I agree with your thoughts! Loving how furniture throwaways are transformed and given new life. I purchased trial sizes/small pots of ASCP paint and Miss Mustard Seed wax which was recommended by my supplier. For my first attempt, I wanted to use the "real thing" so I had something to compare. I also bought an ASCP brush, because I wanted to have the right tools to do a great job. The ASCP was lovely and the Miss Mustard Seed wax was incredible. It was like applying hand lotion to your furniture - a neutral to pleasant odour and a texture that is creamy and a dream to apply (avoid using more than you need).
    Since then I have used POP in my diy chalk paint and have done several pieces. They came out great so I have no plans to pay more than I have to. However, I don't have a good substitute for the wax. I don't want strong toxic smells....I want to do my projects indoors without affecting me, my family and pets. (I get headaches). If you have suggestions for a low odour but great wax, I would appreciate it.

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